One year of Trump: success or failure? (Pt. 2)

One+year+of+Trump%3A+success+or+failure%3F+%28Pt.+2%29

Riley Garland

A year ago, our nation watched Donald Trump become President of the United States. While some were filled with anger or disbelief, others watched with hopeful hearts that this day would mark change. One thing we all shared, though, is uncertainty about the new administration. Now, as the anniversary of his inauguration comes to pass, I would argue there’s a lot to celebrate.

Say what you will about Donald Trump, but one thing we should all be able to agree on is his strong boost of the economy. The stock market is doing better than ever, hitting new milestones almost weekly that leave investors in awe. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate has dipped to 4.1 percent, with the lowest rates on record ever for Hispanics (4.7 percent) and African Americans (6.8 percent).

The new administration has also dialed back regulations, eliminating 22 for every new one.

Another economic success was the passage of tax reform. With Trump’s new tax plan, which is his largest victory thus far, many businesses are raising their wages and investing more money in the United States. In fact, just a few days ago, Apple CEO Tim Cook cited the tax reform as a primary reason for Apple’s $350 billion investment into America.
Some media critics have tried to attribute the economic success to former President Obama. But, according to a Wall Street Journal poll, the vast majority of economists agree that the credit belongs to Trump.

Aside from the economy, Trump has made strides in many other key areas. Illegal border crossing has fallen 41 percent. ISIS was defeated in Raqqa, crippling the organization to almost nothing. North and South Korea are finally talking again for the first time in years, which was brought about by Trump, according to the South Korean President. And of course, Neil Gorsuch, a strong constitutional originalist, was appointed to the Supreme Court. These are all strong wins for the Trump Administration.

Although policy is important, it isn’t the only thing setting aside Trump from his predecessor. I think we can all agree our president isn’t the most, well, “delicate” with his words. His character has brought a much different presence to the Oval Office.

Trump has a tendency to throw punches often, usually directed at the Democrat Media Complex and the Democratic Party. Sometimes, though, those punches land on people in his own party, such as Sen. Jeff Flake from Arizona. A lot of times, it inhibits his agenda, as opposed to advancing it.

In the coming years, I hope to see our president allow his actions to speak more than his words. While he spouts off on Twitter too much, though, I would argue the change has been for the better.

If there’s one thing that can be said for Trump’s character, it’s that he has tremendous respect for our servicemen and servicewomen. He talks tirelessly about how much more these men and women deserve for serving us, and of the great sacrifices they have made.

It’s no surprise that the police, military and border patrol have been some of Trump’s strongest supporters going all the way back to the campaign. Say what you will about Donald, but he has been unwavering in his support back. Contrast this with the previous administration, which helped fuel distrust and anger towards these groups, and we can all agree the change was much needed.

So, 365 days later, it’s safe to say that Trump may not have been such a bad idea. Now, that’s not to ignore that there’s been issues within the administration, which there certainly has been. But, if you can get past his Twitter rants and brash language, there’s a lot to be excited about these next three (hopefully seven) years.

Sound Off

John Yezbak, senior
business management

“The first year was characteristic of a sad trend in politics. Corruption doesn’t even have to be hidden anymore.”

Jashelle King, sophomore
Native American studies

“I don’t like how he degrades women, and he’s taken a lot of steps backward. Everybody should have an equal opportunity regardless of their background.”

Brandon Badour, senior fisheries and wildlife management

“His mouth is a loose cannon, it’s a matter of time before he gets himself and us into trouble.”