Rape jokes reveal hidden tensions in society

David Exelby

“Enjoy a footlong in jail,” the New York Post plastered all across their front page this past week in regard to the charges made against the former Subway spokesman, Jared Fogle. Let’s face it: what the New York Post wrote is not only insensitive and in poor taste, but it is simply wrong. That being said, the rage that the New York Post expressed is quite understandable in light of recent events

Within the past year there have been several high profile individuals who have been exposed for their sexual crimes—none of which have been criminalized. Bill Cosby and Josh Duggar come to mind when discussing a topic like this not only due to their public status but also because of the lack of action taken against them.

Duggar spent the last year in the dumps as the sins of his past were finally exposed. Somehow, though, he has still managed to avoid criminal charges and gets to roam free while many other adolescents that committed his same crime had to spend time in places from juvenile counseling facilities to prison. All Duggar has had to face are civil suits.

Duggar has some company when it comes to getting away without any criminal charges filed against him and only facing civil action. Cosby has paved the way for celebrities to literally get away with rape.

Here is a man that openly admits to drugging women and then raping them. His situation was handled in a very similar manner to Duggar’s scandals. All he has to worry about is civil action against him by some of his victims.

Fogle does face criminal charges. But there is still something fishy about the whole situation: yes, Fogle pleaded guilty—but according to his attorney, this is all due to a “medical problem.” Now, it is highly suspected that pedophilia is a sort of mental disoder, but it seems that this sort of plea would not be nearly as acceptable if the man pleading guilty to these crimes were just some average man. This uncomfortably relaxed method of criminalizing public figures is what probably made the writers at the New York Post enraged enough to say what they did.

But what is probably most angering about the actions of these public figures is their hypocrisy. For decades Cosby has taken stands on marriage, raising children and morality. Duggar was a part of Family Research Council—a Christian group focused on cultivating better families. And finally Fogle lead the Jared Foundation and sought out ending childhood obesity.

These were all men who expressed a desire to better the community but failed in the most monstrous of ways.

That is why the New York Post printed such a disgusting piece for their front page. They are simply expressing an anger that many people currently feel.

It is not that what the New York Post did is acceptable. But it points to a desire to make sure that public figures should not simply get away with sexual crimes; society is sick and tired of hypocrisy. What our culture wants is justice. The question now is, will it ever be served?