Bringing schnitzel to Superior

Dain Holter

The Steinhaus is an upscale, yet modest restaurant that serves delicious German-inspired dishes. The restaurant itself isn’t attempting to be a German pub, but the environment definitely sets a cultural feel and they’ve adapted it to work in Marquette quite nicely. The dining area is well decorated and brings a modern flare with its black chairs and tables covered in brown paper.

re-steinhaus-kylelafrinereIn the windowsill lies three beer steins, just like you’d imagine in an authentic German eatery, and an English/ German dictionary rests alongside. With pictures of the homeland on the wall, the steins lining the window sills and the very personal environment of the Steinhaus, I almost felt as if I was being welcomed to my long lost German grandmother’s house as I was greeted at the door.

The menu holds unique offerings unlike any other in the area. The restaurant itself is relatively small and presents a smaller selection of food with few appetizers, bratwursts, a seasonal and a constant menu and the option to buy a round for the kitchen.

While the restaurant’s atmosphere is casual, it is still upscale and this is reflected in their menu prices with appetizers ranging from $5 to $10 and most dinner plates ranging from $20 to $25.
As I read through the menu, I found myself often Googling different components of menu items just to figure out what they were, like cornichons, which turns out is just fancy pickles.

That being said, the staff was very polite and knowledgeable, answering all the questions that Google wouldn’t answer. The Steinhaus offers a fun experience, because you can always try something new and learn about different foods, engaging you more with the food you’re consuming.

To start my meal off, I ordered the charcuterie (assorted meat) plate and the cheese plate. It was a beautiful selection of thin sliced sausage and delectable cheeses. When the plate arrived to the table, I couldn’t help but notice how artfully plated my appetizer was.

They truly put care into the presentation of each dish. I paired the appetizers with one of the restaurants many beers, an exquisite Shorts Peachy Pom Pom sour ale. You just don’t see the sheer variety of sour ales and other unique brews that are available at the Steinhaus anywhere else in Marquette. They host craft beers from lesser known breweries like “Evil Twin” and “Jolly Pumpkin,” as well as a German favorite offered on tap—Weihenstephan. If you’re looking to find your new favorite brew, the expansive beer menu of the Steinhaus is just the place.

After much contemplation on which entrée to try, I decided to go for the Steinhaus take a on a German classic—the Wiener schnitzel. This is a deep-fried, breaded veal cutlet, placed over a mound of spätzle, which is a soft egg noodle, and red cabbage. Also, served with a caper and parsley sauce. You can also add a fried egg atop your schnitzel, which I opted for.

The dish is a decently large portion and again Steinhaus really wowed me with presentation. I almost didn’t want to cut into my veal cutlet out of fear of destroying the piece of artwork that had been placed before me. But what would be the point of that? I went there to eat.

I dumped the sauce atop my schnitzel and cut into the tender cutlet. The egg yolk broke and added the creamy texture that was needed. After the first bite, I was addicted. It’s a beautiful combination, with the meatiness of the veal, the crunch of the breading and the sauce to top it all off. It was absolutely delicious.

I ordered this because it’s a classic on their menu, but for those feeling adventurous, they have a seasonal, constantly changing menu with things like flank steak and a duck breast entrée that I’m sure would tantalize taste buds just as the schnitzel does.

I would recommend this restaurant to anyone wanting to try some delicious German cuisine right here in Marquette. I encourage people to try a new beer and a new entrée by making their next night out a visit to the Steinhaus.